A Few More Spider Mums

Just in case anyone hasn’t seen enough of my spider mum photos – I found a few more . . .

The Senkyo Kenshin Spider Mum has similar colors as the Coral Reef Spider Mum – just in subtler, more pastel shades of yellow, pink and peach.

Senkyo kensin Spider mum© 2011 Patty Hankins

Senkyo kensin Spider mum© 2011 Patty Hankins

Senkyo kensin Spider mum© 2011 Patty Hankins

The Showers Spider Mum is a striking flower with white petals.When I first saw them – I thought they looked like mop heads!

Showers Spider Mum© 2011 Patty Hankins

Showers Spider Mum© 2011 Patty Hankins

I hope you’ve enjoyed all the Spider Mum photos I’ve posted recently – as you can tell – they really are one of my favorite types of chrysanthemums.

New Photo: Mancetta Sunset Chrysanthemum

 

Mancetta Sunset ChrysanthemumMancetta Sunset Chrysanthemum © 2012 Patty Hankins

 

I’ve recently added a new photo –  Mancetta Sunset Chrysanthemum – to my Beautifulflowerpictures.com website.

In past few years, I’ve really come to appreciate all the wonderful varieties of chrysanthemums that are available. One of my favorites is the Mancetta Sunset Chrysanthemum – an anemone mum – with its petals in shades of peaches and oranges – with a bright yellow center. I hope you find this chrysanthemum to be as wonderful as I do.

This photograph is available as  either at 10 X 10″ or 20 X 20″ gallery-wrapped canvas.  You can order Mancetta Sunset Chrysanthemum from my website.

Domingo, Pelee, Red YoAuburn and Icy Isle – Beautiful Single Mums

One of the most common types of Chrysanthemums are the Single Mums. Also known as Semi-double mums – these wonderful daisy-like flowers feature a center disk and one or more rows of petals. When you look at any of the single mums – it’s easy to see why chrysanthemums are members of the Aster family.

The Domingo mum are bright reddish-pink with pale yellow accents.


Domingo Chrysanthemum
© 2011 Patty Hankins

Domingo Chrysanthemum© 2011 Patty Hankins

The  Pelee Mums are a w0nderful yellow flower with dark orange accents on some of the petals. I really liked the pattern created by the petals when two flowers intersect.

Pelee Chrysanthemum© 2011 Patty Hankins

Pelee Chrysanthemum© 2011 Patty Hankins

The Icy Isle Mums are a striking white flower with a yellow center disk. They remind so much of some of my favorite types of daisies.

Icy Isle Chrysanthemum© 2011 Patty Hankins

Icy Isle Chrysanthemum© 2011 Patty Hankins

And finally the Red YoAuburn Chrysanthemums. These wonderful flowers add a great splash of color with their auburn red petals and bright yellow centers.

Red YoAuburn Mums© 2011 Patty Hankins

Red YoAuburn Mums© 2011 Patty Hankins

Paint Box and Apricot Courtier – Reflex Chrysanthemums

This year I finally photographed some varieties of Reflex Chrysanthemums. This is one of the thirteen classes of mums that I hadn’t seen before. Reflex mums are distinguished by their downward overlapping florets. The tops of the flowers are often full, and a bit flattened. What I really liked about the two varieties of reflex mums that I photographed was the color variations within each flower.

The Apricot Courtier reflex mums are a lovely pale apricot with some pale yellow petals near the top.


Apricot Courtier Reflx Chrysanthemum© 2011 Patty Hankins

Apricot Courtier Reflx Chrysanthemum

© 2011 Patty Hankins

Apricot Courtier Reflx Chrysanthemum© 2011 Patty Hankins

The Paint Box Reflex Chrysanthemums are a rich shade of  reddish orange with bright yellow highlight petals

Paint Box Reflex Chrysanthemum© 2011 Patty Hankins

Paint Box Reflex Chrysanthemum© 2011 Patty Hankins

Mancetta Sunset and Purple Light Anemone Chrysanthemums

Anemone Chrysanthemums are another of the thirteen types of mums recognized by the National Chrysanthemum Society. They are named for the sea anemones. Anemone mums have flat rows of petals with a raised center of small florets. I’ve photographed two varieties of anemone mums – hope you enjoy them.

The Mancetta Sunset Anemone Mums have wonderful shades of orange and yellow in them. They are beautiful fall flowers.

Mancetta Sunrise Anemone Chrysanthemum© 2011 Patty Hankins

Mancetta Sunrise Anemone Chrysanthemum© 2011 Patty Hankins

The Purple Light Anemone Chrysanthemums really show the characteristic raised center florets of the anemone mums. It extends way above the rows of petals.

Purple Light Anemone Chrysanthemum© 2011 Patty Hankins

Purple Light Anemone Chrysanthemum
© 2011 Patty Hankins

Purple Light Anemone Chrysanthemum© 2011 Patty Hankins

Coral Reef Chrysanthemum – March 2011 Photo of the Month

Coral Reef Chrysanthemum

Coral Reef Chrysanthemum (c) 2011 Patty Hankins

 

Last fall I photographed some Coral Reef Chrysanthemums – and absolutely fell in love with these wonderful flowers. Coral Reef Chrysanthemums are amazing to see – full of textures and colors. Like most spider mums, Coral Reef has many long narrow petals that curve at the end. In the center are shorter curlier petals. And then there are the colors of the Coral Reef Chrysanthemum – amazing shades of yellow, orange and red.

Chrysanthemums have been cultivated for centuries. It was used as an herb in China as early as the 15th century B.C. By the 8th century A.D, it had arrived in Japan where the emperor eventually adopted chrysanthemums as his official seal. In recent times, many wonderful types of chrysanthemums have been developed. The U.S. National Chrysanthemum Society has classified thirteen forms of chrysanthemums. Spider mums are probably my favorite form of chrysanthemums.

In additional to being an amazing decorative flower, some very practical uses of chrysanthemums have evolved. In Asia, chrysanthemums are used in making tea and as salad greens. Certain varieties can be used to created insecticides that are less toxic to mammals and birds than many synthetic pesticides. They have also been found to reduce indoor air pollution. Medicinally chrysanthemums are supposed to help treat everything from high blood pressure to bacterial infections.

Until March 31, 2011, SAVE 20% off the regular prices for Coral Reef Chrysanthemum. The photograph is available through my website in two sizes of gallery-wrapped canvases.

Save $ 30 on the 18X12″ Canvas – regular price $ 147 –  March Photo of the Month Price – $ 117.00

Save $ $ 110 on the 30X20″ Canvas – regular price $ 547 – March Photo of the Month Price – $ 437.00

Free shipping to U.S. Addresses for either size photograph.

As with all photographs from BeautifulFlowerPictures.com, Coral Reef Chrysanthemum comes with my Unconditional Happiness Guarantee. You have one year to decide that it is the perfect photograph for you. If it’s not, just return it (in original condition) for a full refund.

Hagoromo Intermediate Incurve Mums

Last fall I photographed several types of chrysanthemums. One of the most interesting types was two different sets of Hagoromo Intermediate Incurve Mums. Both sets were photographed at Longwood Gardens, about a month apart.

Hagoromo Chrysanthemum

(c) 2010 Patty Hankins

Intermediate incurve mums are one of three types of incurve mums: irregular, regular and intermediate. Incurve mums have upward curving petals. The flowers on the intermediate incurve mums tend to be about 6 inches in diameter.

Hagoromo Chrysanthemum(c) 2010 Patty Hankins

The second set of Hagoromo mums I photographed were a darker shade of pink than the first set. They also hadn’t opened up as much as the first set. I really enjoyed photographed the patterns and textures of the flowers that were just starting to open up.

Hagoromo Chrysanthemum(c) 2010 Patty Hankins

Hagoromo Chrysanthemum(c) 2010 Patty Hankins

Hagoromo Chrysanthemum(c) 2010 Patty Hankins

Hagoromo Chrysanthemum(c) 2010 Patty Hankins

I hope to get a chance to see the 2010 Chrysanthemum display at Longwood Gardens. The 2009 chrysanthemums were amazing – I can’t wait to see what they have on display this year.


Spoon Mums – Redwing, Trendy Time and Yolaporte

I’ve been looking at some of the photos I took last year – and have never gotten around to editing or posting here on the blog. I found a fun set from last year’s Chrysanthemum Festival at Longwood Gardens. I figured I’d better start sharing these – before I start photographing chrysanthemums this year.

One of the major groups of chrysanthemums are the Spoon Mums (chrysanthemum x morifolium). They are closely related to the daisy mums. The difference is in the petals. In the spoon mums, the petals form a tube – and then open out into a spoon shape at the end. They are very distinctive looking.

I photographed three types of spoon mums at last year’s Chrysanthemum Festival.

The first is the Redwing Spoon Mum. I love the contrast of yellow, white and red in these flowers.

Redwing Spoon Mum  - chrysanthemum x morifolium

(c) 2010 Patty Hankins

Redwing Spoon Mum - chrysanthemum x morifolium(c) 2010 Patty Hankins

I had fun taking this final photo of the Redwing Spoon Mum – I loved the way the spoon ends of the petals look when one flower overlaps another.

Redwing Spoon Mum - chrysanthemum x morifolium(c) 2010 Patty Hankins

Next is the Yolaporte Spoon Mum – a wonderful purple, yellow and white chrysanthemum

Yolaporte Spoon Mum - chrysanthemum x morifolium(c) 2010 Patty Hankins

Yolaporte Spoon Mum - chrysanthemum x morifolium(c) 2010 Patty Hankins

And yet again – I had fun photographing the petals

Yolaporte Spoon Mum - chrysanthemum x morifolium

(c) 2010 Patty Hankins

And finally the Trendy Time Spoon Mum – a wonderful flower in shades of yellow

Trendy Time Spoon Mum - chrysanthemum x morifolium

(c) 2010 Patty Hankins

Now that I know how to identify a Spoon Mum – I’ll be keeping my out so I can photograph more varieties of them.

Crimson Tide and Houston – Irregular Incurve Chrysanthemum

Another of the thirteen classes of chrysanthemums I photographed at Longwood Gardens Chrysanthemum festival this year were two members of the Irregular Incurve Class of chrysanthemums. According to the National Chrysanthemum Society, irregular incurve chrysanthemums are described as “These are the giant blooms of the chrysanthemum genus. The florets (petals) loosely incurve and make fully closed centers. The lower florets present an irregular appearance and may give a skirted effect.”

The first variety of irregular incurve chrysanthemums I photographed was a wonderful maroon and yellow flower called “Crimson Tide.”

(c) 2009 Patty Hankins

This next photo shows the compact center of the flower

(c) 2009 Patty Hankins

And one that shows the irregular petals around the edge. I love the way the petals curl

(c) 2009 Patty Hankins

The second variety of irregular incurve chrysanthemum I photographed was Houston – a bright yellow flower.

(c) 2009 Patty Hankins

I hope you’re enjoying my chrysanthemum photos. I’m still editing my photos from the Longwood Gardens Chrysanthemum Festival and I will be posting more of them here in the next few weeks.

Golden Splendour and Descanso Spider Chrysanthemums

When I visited the Chrysanthemum show at Longwood Gardens this fall, I was amazed at all the varieties of mums that were on display. As I explored the exhibit, I learned that there are thirteen bloom forms of chrysanthemums.

One of my favorites is the Spider Mums. According to the classification system of the National Chrysanthemum Society “Spiders have long tubular ray florets which may coil or hook at the ends. The florets may be very fine to course.”

At Longwood Gardens, I photographed three  varieties of spider chrysanthemums. The first is a wonderful bright yellow Golden Splendour Spider Chrysanthemum.

(c) 2009 Patty Hankins

The Golden Splendour Chrysanthemums were growing in groups in the conservatory when I visited. The groupings of the these large yellow flowers were magnificent.

(c) 2009 Patty Hankins

The flowers were as interesting from the side as they were from above. This next photo shows the incredible three dimensional look of the flowers.

(c) 2009 Patty Hankins

The second variety of spider chrysanthemum that I photographed was a Descano Spider Chrysanthemum. I wasn’t very happy with most of my photos of the Descano flowers. The red, orange and yellow colors in the blossoms were incredible. The one photo that I am happy with is this close up that shows the intricate detail and texture of the flower.

(c) 2009 Patty Hankins

The third variety of spider mum I photographed was an unnamed purple variety. I love the way these flowers look in a group.

(c) 2009 Patty Hankins

(c) 2009 Patty Hankins

I hope Longwood Gardens has another chrysanthemum show next year, I really would like to photograph more varieties of spider mums.


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